Review of the Kershaw RJII 1980ST Knife - Cramer Imaging - Quality Fine Art Photography
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Review of the Kershaw RJII 1980ST Knife

Review of the Kershaw RJII 1980ST Knife
It was Christmas time when my spouse and I walked into the new local Sportsman's' Warehouse to check out the new facility.  The last thing on our minds was to purchase a pocket knife for me.  I already had a good blade which I carry with me.

Cramer Imaging's professional quality product photograph of a partially extended Kershaw RJII 1980ST pocket knife in Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho

We walked over to the the knife counter and I remembered that we had lost a rather well-liked pocket knife several months ago.  We had not found any replacements for it yet.  Here was the chance to browse some of the higher quality knives.

We started looking for that replacement knife with a few criteria such as the pocket clip, blade length, and the "flipper" or the quick deploy switch.  The salesman showed us a Kershaw RJII 1980ST that was on sale at the time.  I started checking in out as my spouse was looking at other options.

Cramer Imaging's professional quality product photograph of a Kershaw RJII 1980ST pocket knife folded up in Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho

As I was deciding what to think of the knife in my hand, I found that I really liked how it fit my hand.  It was the right size and the right shape to be very comfortable in my hand.  After this revelation, I started looking closer at it.

The Kershaw knife I was examining also has buttons on the blade for a swivel open with the thumb.  This, unfortunately, seems to be a feature more for decoration than for function.

Cramer Imaging's professional quality product photograph of a Kershaw RJII 1980ST Knife showing swappable pocket clip location in Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho
There are holes bored into both ends of the handle so that the pocket clip may be switched to either end of the blade as the user prefers.  The clip is extra tight against the handle so I have too much trouble attaching it to my pocket.

The bottom half of the blade is serrated to make the job of cutting things like rope much easier.  Just watch your fingers around those serrations as they will cut your fingers just as easily.

I have very little to complain about the knife.  The only complaint I have about it is how hard the quick release hits when it flips the blade out.  The first few times I tried it, I either knocked the knife clear out of my hand or I ended up hurting my fingers.  It has taken some practice and training for me to control the knife as it opens using this method.

When we first acquired the blade, I tried the pocket clip in my pocket.  I immediately learned that the clip was too tight on the knife for it to slip over the edge of my pocket.  A small amount of bending and repositioning the clip and it will now work with my jeans pockets.

Cramer Imaging's professional quality product photograph of a Kershaw RJII 1980ST Knife opened displaying pocket clip in Pocatello, Bannock, Idaho

With the serration, it will require some special tools for sharpening.  A standard whet stone will not do for those teeth.

Overall: I highly recommend this knife for someone with smaller hands.  It is a dandy blade for use in the field.  It's built for use not display so you can count on it when you need it.